Coleman & Sons Real Estate
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Posted by Coleman & Sons Real Estate on 10/11/2019

Everyone has experienced that overflowing, chaotic closet. Clothes everywhere and you can't find what you're looking for. For some, this occurs occasionally, but for others, especially those with smaller closets, this can be a constant stressor that effects your time getting ready in the morning and your mental stress when trying to get where you're going. Not everyone can afford a fancy closet system that easily helps organize your clothes, and some simply don't have the space to implement one. So, what can you do to help yourself organize your clothing without installing a system? Here are a few simple organization methods to consider.

Organize by like colors. 

If you pair your outfits by matching colors, it can help to organize your clothing by color. Arrange black with black, blue with blue and so on. It can further help to hang your clothes to organize by color and in a sort of gradient pattern. Start with black, then grey, then white, then yellow, green, blue, purple pink, brown, patterns, etc. You get the idea. When you look in your closet each morning, you can head directly for the color you want to wear that day and easily find the clothes to match.

Organize by like items. 

Hanging your clothing by like items is another simple way to organize. Hang jeans, pants, skirts then dresses together. Then, hang shirts together and separate by type: tank-tops, t-shirts, long sleeves, button downs, sweaters, sweatshirts, jackets. When you go to get ready, you'll be able to easily see the different pieces you need to complete your outfit.

Organize by purpose. 

If you wear specific clothing for work that you donít wear outside of work, it can be beneficial to organize your clothing by purpose. Put all your work-wear together and all your casual wear together. Place workout clothes together and all your dress clothes together. 

Organize by frequency worn. 

One more idea, particularly useful for narrow closets is to separate your clothes by the frequency that you wear them. Put the clothing you wear most toward the front of your closet and the clothes you wear least toward the back. Depending on the season you might consider moving your winter or summer clothing to the back of your closet until the appropriate time. 

By implementing any one or a combination of the methods above you'll be well on your way to staying organized, saving time and reducing morning stress. If you have a lot of clothing and will be moving to a new home soon make sure that a large closet with a built-in organization system is on your checklist of required home features. Your professional real estate agent will help you find the best home for your wardrobe.




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Posted by Coleman & Sons Real Estate on 6/14/2019

Moving to a new home can be either a fun experience or a very stressful time for you. It all depends on the way you manage the move. Being prepared for the entire process is one definite way of making sure that the whole moving experience is a fun one for you. Follow these simple ideas for a smooth moving operation.

- Find a moving company. Except you want to do the moving yourself, you might be better off with a professional moving company. Ask for good recommendations and decide on one mover that is well within your budget. Schedule a date for the moving with the company when you finally pick one. You can begin this about two months before you have to leave, to give you enough time to wrap up the process.

- Sort and purge. Decide what you want to move to your new home. Some items will probably be too old or useless where you are going too, so you should sell, give to your neighbors or donate to charity. During this period, you should also work on exhausting things that you wonít move, such as perishable food items or cleaning supplies. Ideally, you should start doing this about six weeks before your moving date.

- Start Packing. At about a month to your moving date, you should start packing your non-essential items into boxes. Things that you don't use frequently should be the first to go in your boxes. Make sure you mark individual boxes with a label that identifies what is in the box and what room itís going to in your new home. As your move date draws nearer, everything you no longer need until you settle in at your new home you should pack at once.

- Clear out your home. If you have storage facilities outside your current home, like a garage or shed, you should start clearing them out for the move. You want to avoid forgetting something that might turn out to be very important. Wash, dry and pack up all your clothing too. Also, donít forget to return all items you may have borrowed from neighbors in the past.

- Final arrangements. In the last days before you leave, go round your house a few times to be sure you are not leaving anything behind. Pack a night bag that you can live out of, pending when you finally settle in at your new home. If you are using professional movers, be sure to ask them for wardrobe boxes to make it easier to have your clothes when you arrive. If you need recommendations on moving companies, ask around at the next neighborhood meeting.

Moving doesn't need to be stressful for you if handled well. Sometimes all you need is a plan of action.




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Posted by Coleman & Sons Real Estate on 5/3/2019

Whether you're just doing a seasonal cleanup or you're clearing out in preparation to move, sorting through your things might seem challenging. There are, however, several things that you really are going to have to think about. Just get rid of them. NOW!

  1. Condiments. When your fast food, take-out, or delivery habit leaves your refrigerator cluttered with soy sauce and mustard packets, it's time to do some sorting. And it's not just those pesky little packages that can burst open in unexpected places. You probably have a cache of plastic utensils filling up drawer space too. Find a way to organize them or toss them out.
  2. Prescriptions. Whether you no longer need it or itís past its date, keeping old medicine in the cabinet not only takes up space, it poses a risk to family members. Before you just flush them down the drain, though, follow the advice from the FDA on drug disposal.
  3. Unmatched socks. So, your dryer (or washers) eats socks. At least, that's the theory because you knew you put a pair in and only one came out. The sock monster strikes again. In some homes, this phenomenon results in piles of mismatched socks, and there's no reason to hang on to them. Turn them into dust mittens, cut them up for crafts, or toss them. 
  4. Paint. Saving a small amount of paint for repairs and touch-ups, if stored properly in an airtight container, is a great idea. But keeping partial cans of colors that you probably won't ever use before they dry up is just a waste of space. And remember, paint fades over time, so you may not be able to use a bright color for those patches anyway. Paint is considered hazardous waste, so you shouldnít just toss it in the trash bin. Contact your trash company for advice on where and how to get rid of leftover paint and unusable supplies.
  5. Old spices. No, not the cologne. Kitchen spices lose their savor and can ruin a great dish if used after their expiration date. Of course, not all spice jars have dates on them, so a general rule of thumb is two to three years. Spices last longer when kept in a dry environment such as air-tight containers that are closed up properly after each use. Often, you'll find that half the spices that came on that decorative spice rack are not items you use in your culinary masterpieces. If you haven't used them in a year, donate them. If it's been more than three years, toss them. 

Even if you're not prepared to sell just yet, including these clutter busters into your routine will keep things under control so that when you're ready to make a move it'll be hassle-free. When you are ready, ask your real estate or moving professional about other ways to quickly bring order to chaos.





Posted by Coleman & Sons Real Estate on 3/15/2019

The garage can be a haven for your vehicle or a total dumping ground for everything else under the sun. Sometimes that space can become the black hole that you just toss items at when you're in a hurry to move on with other activities. 

Then Spring cleaning fever hits and you are determined to get the garage cleaned out and make it more useful to you and your family. Envisioning space for your car(s), sports equipment, tools and holiday decorations you dive into the weekend project of sorting through and organizing all the stuff.

Useful and Necessary

Emptying everything out of your garage space out into the light to sort through can be half the battle, so enlist the help of the entire able-bodied household member. Put your items in categories when you take them out, this will make evaluating what to keep easier. Take your lifestyle into consideration and then rank each grouping by how often you use them. By the frequency of use, you can assign the proper location. 

Once empty, you can see the layout of your garage space and how to create areas for storage. Frequently items up front towards the garage door for easy access. Holiday storage or seasonal items stored in the back or even up high on shelves or ceiling racks. Once you understand what things will be going back into your garage and the space you have available for storage you can decide how to keep your items organized.

Containers galore

You may dream of neat and tidy boxes all in a row, clearly labeled and uniform in size. That is mostly just a dream. Your items are of all shapes and sizes and need their own individual way of storage. Try to stay away for cardboard boxes since garages can be damp. Clear boxes can help you find your items quickly without having to label. Remember that you can hang things on the wall like yard tools or sports equipment. 

Many creative storage options can be found out there to help you make the most of your garage storage possibilities. Taking a look online can help you find what may work for you. Whatever you choose make sure it has ease of use for those individuals that will be assessing those items on a regular basis.

Take a tour of your local open houses and make sure to peak into the garage space and note the storage possibilities.





Posted by Coleman & Sons Real Estate on 12/7/2018

A pantry is a coveted feature for many homeowners. Especially those come from small apartments or houses. No more stacking items like the Leaning Tower of Pisa or reaching back into the endless depths hoping to land on your favorite spice mix.

However, all the extra space can cause a new organizational problem - thereís so much that you donít know what to do with it. If finding ingredients has become an aerobics exercise from searching them top to bottom each time you cook todayís article is for you.

Instead of tall jars opt for flat square stackable containers. By taking up more surface space and less height they canít hide behind one another. Label each container so you know at a glance which is flour and which powdered sugar.

Take advantage of the space your pantry door provides. Install hooks to hang pans or lids down the length of the door. Or for a weekend craft project install a large magnet and put spices in little jars with metal lids. Youíll just want to make sure your magnet has a strong enough hold that all of your jars donít come crashing down each time the kids inevitably slam the door shut.

For ultimate organization install a chalkboard along the inside (or outside) of your pantry door for an ongoing shopping list. Add a small lip to hold some chalk so anyone in the family can add on to the list when they finish up the last snack of the bunch. This helps cut down on time spent taking inventory of your home staples and which need to be restocked.

Take advantage of space below shelving in your pantry with crates. These are great for storing the aforementioned kid snacks, baking items and extra items you stock up on to stretch the time between shopping trips. Install wheels on the bottom to make them easier to pull in and out or into the main kitchen area.

Create zones throughout your pantry with items like under-the-shelf racks, stacking shelves, lazy susans, and clear bins. These not only help you keep like-items together but also to capitalize on the space you have. Label bins to help the rest of your family keep things tidy. Under-the-shelf racks are great for more delicate items like bread and root vegetables to stay up and out of the way from the threats of cans and jars.

Alternatively get creative and use a shower caddy or magazine rack hung from the inside of the door for your root vegetables and bread. Measure the space between the door and shelf when closed to ensure the correct depth or match the spacing between each so the height of bins matches that of shelf spacing.




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